Protein, Carbohydates, Fat and their deeper classifications

Most foods can be readily classified according to the organic compounds (proteins, carbohydrates, fats, etc.) they contain in greatest abundance.

Proteins, along with carbohydrates and fats, form the major components of living matter. They maintain the functional activity of the cells and serve as structural and reserve materials.

This is a general classification of foods. EVERY food contains more or less an amount of protein, carbohydrates and/or fats at the same time, of course, each in different proportions. Meats for example are basically high in protein and that’s why they are characterized as proteins even if they also contain carbs and fats, vegetables or legumes contain basically carbohydrates and thus characterized as carbs etc. Same goes for nuts, fruits etc. Going deeper to these analogies will help us find out the right combinations so that we have the best digestion and less delay of foods in our stomach or the gut, which can cause fermentation and several bad bacteria to grow.

Let’s examine some basic rules of food combining concerning protein:

ANIMAL PROTEINS::Compared to all other food groups,the animal protein foods require the most complex digestion, especially within the stomach. They all require high concen-trations of the enzyme pepsinogen,which is made up from hydrochloric acid and the enzyme pepsin.

  • The best combination for animal protein foods is with salads or cooked vegetables, ΝΟ starchy vegetables (see below). Therefore, do not combine nuts with cheese, nor any of the following concentrated protein foods with each other: nuts, avocado, soy beans, cheese, eggs, flesh foods.
  • Alfalfa sprouts, which are considered a green vegetable, may be used with a concentrated protein.
  • A seafood combination is alright if no other food groups are eaten at the same time, apart from salads.
  • A mixed grill is a very complicated meal to digest, especially when potatoes and other starches are combined. DO NOT combine animal protein with starches. Your body requires an acid base to digest proteins and an alkaline base to digest starches.

  • Any fish meal is ideal with salads or cooked vegetables. Fish and chips are a fair combination,but not as a regular meal.
  • Eggs should not be combined with other animal proteins. Eggs in vegetable omelets is alright.
  • It is not recommended to combine any animal protein food with another or with cheese.

  • Do not eat acid fruits (see chart) with proteins. Citrus, tomatoes, pineapple, strawberries and other acid fruits should not be eaten with nuts, cheese, eggs or meat. Acid fruits inhibit the flow of gastric juice. The digestion of protein requires an unhampered flow. This is one rule that has given rise to some disagreement and controversy.
  • Do not consume proteins with fats (see chart).

Fat has an inhibiting influence on digestive secretion and lessen the amount and activity of pepsin and hydrochloric acid, necessary for the digestion of protein. The fat may lower the entire digestive tone more than 50 percent. Since most proteins already contain a good deal of fat, it would certainly be contraindicated to add more to the meal.

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion. If you find any of these rules bad for your stomach simply do not apply it. Above the theories, reality is the best guide for you!

Starchy or high Carbohydrate Vegetables

All kinds of potatoes are in this classification. Also included are yams, winter squashes (such as buttercup, hubbard and banana squashes), pumpkin, caladium root, taro root, cassava root and Jerusalem artichokes. (Note: Technically, squashes and pumpkins are fruits.).

Full list of starchy vegetables

Vegetable

% of Carbohydrates

% of Fats

% of Proteins

Glycemic Index

Quantity

Beet canned

90

3

7

64

1 cup (246 g)

Black Beans boiled

74

3

23

64

1 cup (172 g)

Beet cooked

71

6

23

30

1 cup (144 g)

Beet greens

71

6

23

64

1 cup (144 g)

White Sweet Corn, raw

80

11

9

56

1 cup (254 g)

Parsnips

91

4

5

97

Half cup (178 g)

Potato New, boiled

93

1

6

59

Half cup (78 g)

Potato Red, baked

88

2

10

93

(299 g)

Potato Sweet

93

1

6

52

1 cup (200 g)

Potato White, mashed

90

1

9

70

299 g

Tomato orange

72

10

18

50

1 cup (158 g)

Tomato soup

84

8

8

38

Half cup (121 g)

Yam

95

1

4

54

1 cup (136 g)

Green Peas, soup

65

15

20

66

Half cup (128 g)

Green Peas, frozen

72

4

24

47

1 cup (134 g)

Peas, boiled

68

5

27

48

1 cup (160 g)

Lima Beans, frozen

76

2

22

32

311 g

Baked Beans canned

79

3

18

48

1 cup (253 g)

Kidney Beans boiled

73

3

24

29

1 cup

Garbanzo Beans Chickpeas)

78

8

14

33

1 cup (240 g)

Lima Beans

77

3

20

32

124 g

Navy Beans

74

3

23

38

262 g

Pinto Beans canned

72

8

20

39

240 g

Lentils boiled

70

3

27

30

200 g

Plantains cooked

97

1

2

70

200 g

Winter Acorn baked

93

2

5

-

205 g

Winter Butternut boiled

93

2

5

51

205 g

Mildly starchy vegetables

This classification includes carrots, cauliflower, beets, rutabaga and salsify.

Carrots
Globe artichokes
Beets
Rutabaga
Edible pod peas
Winter squash (acorn, butternut, hubbard, banana, etc.)*
Pumpkin*
Water chestnuts
Sprouted grains

Low starchy Vegetables

Vegetable

Form

Carb Count

Sprouts (Beans, Alfafa)

Raw

0.4

Greens (Lettuce, Spinach, Chard) (Half cup)

Raw

1.6

Aparagus

Boiled

0.7

Bamboo Shoots

Canned

0.7

Spring Cabbage

Boiled

0.6

Celery

Raw

0.9

Watercress

Raw

0.4

Common Mushrooms

Raw

0.4

Chicory

Raw

1

Curly Kale

Raw

1.4

Green and Purple Broccolli

Boiled

1.3

Chinese Cabbage

Raw

1.4

Courgette (Zucchini)

Raw

1.8

Unpeeled Cucumber

Raw

1.5

Fennel

Raw

1.8

Lettuce

Raw

1.2

Marrow

Boiled

1.8

Asparagus

Raw

2

Aubergine (Eggplant)

Raw

2.2

Cauliflower

Boiled

2.3

Pumpkin

Raw

2.2

Red Radish

Raw

2

Capsicum (Green Pepper)

Raw

2.6

BASIC CHART (CLICK TO ENLARGE):

Sources: http://www.rawfoodexplained.com