VEGETABLES: The variety of vegetables is abundant and provides the widest range of suitable food combinations. Fresh salads are optimum nutritionally and combine very well with all grains, or nuts and seeds, or animal proteins or legumes.

  • Ideally, fresh vegetables and cooked vegetables are not the best combinations, especially when including the group of starchy vegetables (see charts).


  • Depending on personal taste, numerous combinations of fresh vegetables can be excellent. The taste and colors of vegetables enhances the appetite of any protein meal and combines very well.

  • Vegetables with dairy foods also combine very well. Remember to avoid diary especially cows products. Goat or sheep products (yogurt, cheese, EXCEPT MILK), if well tolerated could be eaten from time to time. Ideally you can combine any vegetable with any protein food or grain and legume meal.

  • Salads combine very well with proteins or starches. Any nonstarchy vegetables (see charts) may be combined with proteins or starch, except tomatoes, which should especially not be used with starches. The green leafy vegetables combine very well with most other foods. They are excellent food and should be used in the diet.
  • Lettuce and other green and nonstarchy vegetables leave the stomach with little change—they pass through the stomach rapidly unless delayed by oily dressings or foods that require a more thorough gastric digestion.
  • If these vegetables are held up in the stomach with other foods, as when using salad with nuts, there is no fermentation.

STARCHY VEGETABLES.

  • Most starch vegetables need to be cooked for easy digestion. Starch vegetables when cooked are prepaired into less complex starches and when digested they require the action of the enzyme ptyalin,which is produced by the action of chewing and salivary glands.
  • Sliced or grated raw starch vegetables such as carrot,radish,beatroot and pumpkin can be a colourful and nutritious addition to a meal.
  • Ideally,starch vegetables should not be combined with nuts,seeds,grains,legumes and animal proteins.

  • Starch vegetables combine well with one another and they combine fairly well with other cooked vegetables and dairy foods such as cheese or yogurt. If two different starches are eaten together in small quantities, this is thought to not cause problems.
  • Slightly starchy vegetables may be combined with more starchy vegetables (e.g. carrots with potatoes).

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion.

 FRUITS:

  • Do not combine fruit with any vegetables except lettuce and celery.

It is best not to combine fruits with vegetables (especially cooked vegetables), proteins or starches because if such a combination of food is eaten, the digestion of the fruit will be delayed and subject to fermentation. Lettuce and celery, however, may be combined with any fruit except melon, and will cause no problem.

Dr. Vetrano says, “Taking green uncooked vegetables with a fruit meal is perfectly all right. Even though some charts state that subacid and sweet fruits combine fair to poorly with green uncooked vegetables, the feeding practices at the Health School indicate that these are good combinations, indeed, even enhancing digestion of the fruit in some conditions of impaired digestion.”

Acid Fruits, Subacid Fruits, Sweet Fruits (see charts at the end of this article)

  • Acid fruits may be used with subacid fruits.

This is an acceptable combination, though some subacid fruits are rather high in sugar and the acid fruit may delay the sugar’s normally quick exit from the stomach. However, there is no sharp line of division between the acid and subacid fruits. If combining subacid fruit with acid fruit, it is better to use only the less subacid fruit.

The acid fruits are those with the tart flavors, for example, citrus, pineapple, strawberries, and certain varieties of apples and other fruits. Tomatoes are also considered acid fruit (without the sugar content of other acid fruit). Tomatoes should not be combined with subacid fruit, nor any other kinds of fruit.

They are best combined with the salad at a meal at which no starchy foods are served.

Acid fruits are best used alone (a single variety), but if used in combination with other acid fruits, this is considered an acceptable combination.

  • Subacid fruits may be used with sweet fruits.

There is no sharp line of division between subacid fruits and sweet fruits. When using subacid fruits with sweet fruits, it is best to use the sweeter varieties of subacid fruit. The subacid fruits are those that possess a slightly acid flavor (but not tart), such as pears, certain apples, grapes, etc. Grapes, for example, can be acid, subacid or sweet. The sweet fruits are those that are rich in sugar and taste sweet-bananas, persimmons, sweet grapes, and so forth, and all dried fruit.

Some people prefer to eat bananas alone, but most people have no difficulty in combining them with subacid and other sweet fruit at a fruit meal.

Dr. Shelton says, “While I have found that bananas combine fairly well with dates, raisins, grapes and a few other sweet fruits and with green leafy vegetables, such as lettuce and celery, I have noted that they digest best if eaten alone. This calls, to mind the fact that Tilden, also, after much testing of the matter, reached the conclusion that bananas are best eaten alone.”

Dried sweet fruits should be used sparingly. Use but one kind at a meal, in small amounts, combined only with subacid fruit and/or fresh sweet fruit and/or with lettuce and/or celery. Overeating of dried fruits will often bring on symptoms similar to a “cold”. The sugar concentration is naturally greater in fruits which have been dried. Some dried fruits, esp. dried apricots, should be soaked overnight to replenish the missing water. Dates are usually used without soaking, figs or raisins can be used either way. If they are rather hard, soaking will soften and improve them.

Sweet fruits combine fairly well with subacid fruits, provided the subacid fruits are on the “sweet side,” for example, use Delicious apples, not Macintosh or Jonathans, with sweet fruit.

It is best to have these fruits at a fruit meal combining only with lettuce and/or celery. Since fruits are usually high in acids or sugars, they do not combine well with other foods.

  • Do not combine sweet fruits with foods that require a long digestive time-foods such as proteins, starches and acid fruits.

The sugars in sweet fruit should be tree to leave the stomach quickly, in perhaps fifteen or twenty minutes, and are apt to ferment if digestion is delayed by mixture with other foods.

Sugar-starch combinations cause additional problems.

When sugar is taken, the mouth quickly fills with saliva, but no ptyalin is present. Ptyalin is essential for starch digestion. If starch is disguised by sugar, honey, molasses, syrup or sweet fruit, the signals are scrambled and digestion is impaired.

Fermentation is inevitable if sugars of any kind are delayed in the stomach awaiting the digestion of starch, protein or acid fruit.

Sugar also has a marked inhibiting effect on the flow of gastric juice and on gastric motility. No other food depresses the action of the stomach and the desire for food as does sugar.

Take Melons Alone

  • Do not consume melons with any other foods.

This rule has been somewhat under question in recent years. Many people who have complained that melons did not agree with them have no trouble handling them when eating only melon at a meal. If you have a history of digestive problems, don’t do it at all.

Melons are more than 90 percent liquid and leave the stomach quickly if not delayed and fermented by combining with other foods.

Generally, all fruits require fairly simple digestion when compaired to starches,proteins and fats,but melons require no digestion in the stomach and are basically the simplest food to assimulate, due to their very high water content and very simple structure;they contain no protein,no fats and a minute carbohydrate content. Melons are best thought of as a drink and should not be eaten after a large meal.They are an ideal breakfast food,make a melon fruit salad with no other food and that will provide maximum benefits and taste sensation. A small quantity of melon with a fruit salad is alright occasionally. Avoid eating melons though with or after a large complex meal because fermentation can occur and lead to gass and possibly stomach and intestinal pains. Let the melon give you the simplest meal alone.

Dr. Vetrano says, “Melons are best taken alone because the sugar and other nutriments are in a less stable form than the nutrients of other fruits. Orange juice may be kept in the refrigerator for an hour with little change in flavor, but if you refrigerate watermelon juice for only ten minutes, its flavor, color and composition markedly change. It decomposes much more quickly than other fruits. Consequently, if it is held in the stomach awaiting the digestion of other foods, it will decompose (ferment) and cause a great deal of gastric distress. Eating watermelon with nuts can really be troublesome.”

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion.

CHARTS

Full list of starchy vegetables

All kinds of potatoes are in this classification. Also included are yams, winter squashes (such as buttercup, hubbard and banana squashes), pumpkin, caladium root, taro root, cassava root and Jerusalem artichokes. (Note: Technically, squashes and pumpkins are fruits.)

Vegetable

% of Carbohydrates

% of Fats

% of Proteins

Glycemic Index

Quantity

Beet canned

90

3

7

64

1 cup (246 g)

Black Beans boiled

74

3

23

64

1 cup (172 g)

Beet cooked

71

6

23

30

1 cup (144 g)

Beet greens

71

6

23

64

1 cup (144 g)

White Sweet Corn, raw

80

11

9

56

1 cup (254 g)

Parsnips

91

4

5

97

Half cup (178 g)

Potato New, boiled

93

1

6

59

Half cup (78 g)

Potato Red, baked

88

2

10

93

(299 g)

Potato Sweet

93

1

6

52

1 cup (200 g)

Potato White, mashed

90

1

9

70

299 g

Tomato orange

72

10

18

50

1 cup (158 g)

Tomato soup

84

8

8

38

Half cup (121 g)

Yam

95

1

4

54

1 cup (136 g)

Green Peas, soup

65

15

20

66

Half cup (128 g)

Green Peas, frozen

72

4

24

47

1 cup (134 g)

Peas, boiled

68

5

27

48

1 cup (160 g)

Lima Beans, frozen

76

2

22

32

311 g

Baked Beans canned

79

3

18

48

1 cup (253 g)

Kidney Beans boiled

73

3

24

29

1 cup

Garbanzo Beans Chickpeas)

78

8

14

33

1 cup (240 g)

Lima Beans

77

3

20

32

124 g

Navy Beans

74

3

23

38

262 g

Pinto Beans canned

72

8

20

39

240 g

Lentils boiled

70

3

27

30

200 g

Plantains cooked

97

1

2

70

200 g

Winter Acorn baked

93

2

5

-

205 g

Winter Butternut boiled

93

2

5

51

205

Mildly starchy vegetables:

This classification includes carrots, cauliflower, beets, rutabaga and salsify.

Carrots
Globe artichokes
Beets
Rutabaga
Edible pod peas
Winter squash (acorn, butternut, hubbard, banana, etc.)*
Pumpkin*
Water chestnuts
Sprouted grains

Low starchy Vegetables

Vegetable

Form

Carb Count

Sprouts (Beans, Alfafa)

Raw

0.4

Greens (Lettuce, Spinach, Chard) (Half cup)

Raw

1.6

Aparagus

Boiled

0.7

Bamboo Shoots

Canned

0.7

Spring Cabbage

Boiled

0.6

Celery

Raw

0.9

Watercress

Raw

0.4

Common Mushrooms

Raw

0.4

Chicory

Raw

1

Curly Kale

Raw

1.4

Green and Purple Broccolli

Boiled

1.3

Chinese Cabbage

Raw

1.4

Courgette (Zucchini)

Raw

1.8

Unpeeled Cucumber

Raw

1.5

Fennel

Raw

1.8

Lettuce

Raw

1.2

Marrow

Boiled

1.8

Asparagus

Raw

2

Aubergine (Eggplant)

Raw

2.2

Cauliflower

Boiled

2.3

Pumpkin

Raw

2.2

Red Radish

Raw

2

Capsicum (Green Pepper)

Raw

2.6

Basic Acid Fruits:

Blackberry, Orange, Passion Fruit, Strawberry, Tangerine, Tomato (technically a fruit), Ugly Fruit, Grapefruit, Acerola Cherry, Grapefruit, Pineapple.

Basic Subacid Fruits:

Apple, Papaya, Peach, Pear, Raspberry, Ugly Fruit, Apricot, Blackberry, Blueberry, Grape, Cherry, Mango, Mulberry, Nectarine, Tamarillo, Guava.

Basic Sweet Fruits:

Banana, Date, Fig, Sapote, Persimmon, Cherimoya, Carob, Mammea, Plantain, Sapodilla, Sugar Apple.

Melons:

Watermelon, Honeydew, Casaba, Cantaloupe, Ambrosia, Banana Melon, Canary, Gaia, Muskmelon, Rock Melon, Winter Melon.

Cereal grains:

This includes all cereals, whether they’re whole or refined, raw or cooked. Examples are wheat, rye, barley, rice, millet, buckwheat and oats.

Legumes:

This includes peanuts, lentils, peas and beans.

Raw foods improve the total inner environment. Sluggish bowels begin to move, eventually cleaning out waste that may have been lodged in the folds of the intestine for months. The layer of mucus that forms in the intestines when cooked food predominates is removed, greatly increasing efficiency in the absorption of nutrients. Food wastes don’t stay in the bowel long enough to putrefy. The transit time of raw food in a healthy body is 20 to 24 hours, while cooked food may take three days or longer.

Don’t forget to print the chart which follows in order to remember and try the food combinations! Click here in case  you have problems with enlarging the image.

Sources: http://www.rawfoodexplained.com