FATS (Avocados, Nuts, other fats):

Use fats sparingly. Even if they are necessary for the human body, the need for fat is small, and the best sources are whole foods like nuts and avocados. Fats delay digestion—may take up to four to six hours. Fats also delay the digestion of other foods and, if used with starch, it will delay the passage of the starch from the stomach into the intestine. Fat not only inhibits the secretion of gastric juice—it also inhibits the physical actions of the stomach. Too much fat taken with a meal results in acid eructations and a burning sensation in the throat.

The use of fat (avocados) with starch is considered acceptable, provided a green salad is included in the meal.

Avocados: Though not a high-protein food, avocados contain more protein than milk. They are high in fat and the small percentage of protein they do contain is of high biological value. Since they are so high in fat that they tend to slow down the digestion of foods normally requiring a shorter digestion time, they are perhaps only a fair combination with subacid* and acid fruit*. They are usually considered a poor combination with sweet fruit, especially dried sweet fruit*.

  • They are best used with a salad meal. When fats (avocados or nuts) are eaten with green vegetables, preferably raw, the inhibiting effect of fats on gastric secretion is counteracted and digestion proceeds quite normally.

  • Don’t combine nuts with starch vegetables, legumes, animal protein or sweet fruits.

  • For optimal digestive efficiency, only one variety of nuts or seeds should be used at a sitting, but, if digestive problems are not a factor, it may be possible to eat two or three varieties together without harm. Some personal experimentation in this area is indicated. Start out with small quantities, one to two ounces, and use only with salads. If you do have problems with nuts, experiment and find those you handle best and use mostly those. You will eventually build, up your nut-digesting ability and be able to use more varieties.
  • Avocados should never be used with nuts, which are also high in fat (see chart)*, nor should they be used with melons (see chart)*.

  • Do not combine cashews with other nuts; the cashew is a part of the cashew apple and is not a true nut. It has a higher carbohydrate content than true nuts, having 29.3% carbohydrate and 17.2% protein. By contrast, for example, the almond has 19.5% carbohydrate and 18.6% protein. They can be eaten with a salad.
  • Peanuts, of course, are not nuts. They are combination starch/protein foods, and are combined as starch.
  • Most people have no problem with sunflower seeds. Those who do can begin by using them slightly sprouted. Just soak overnight, drain and let them progress until just a small sprout is showing.
  • Almonds are valuable nuts, and have a somewhat alkaline reaction, whereas other nuts have the acid reaction commonly found in protein foods. However, they are hard and more difficult to masticate thoroughly. Problems may be avoided by thoroughly masticating and insalivating these nuts.

These fats are not recommended

Butter
Cream

Oils

Use unrefined cold-pressed oils, preferably stable oils like olive and sesame oil, less likely to be rancid. These oils can be moderately cooked.

Olive oil (VERY GOOD CHOICE, DO NOT OVERHEAT, BEST TAKEN RAW)
Sesame oil (LOW CHAIN OIL, GOOD CHOICE FOR COOKING)

Tropical Oils (Coconut oil, Palm Kernel Oil – Very good choices. Can  be kept in room temperatures for months. Very stable when heated)

Flax Seed Oil – Very high in omega 3 content. Keep in the fridge, do not heat. You can use it in small amounts with your salads or salad dressings.

AVOID VEGETABLE OILS – DO NOT HEAT VEGETABLE OILS

Vegetable oils are long chain oils. This means they should not be heated because they become rancid very easily.

Sunflower seed oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil
Cottonseed oil
Safflower oil

Soybean Oil

Should be strictly LIMITED!!! Only Peanut Oil is relatively stable and therefore appropriate for stir-frys on occasion bbut it is very high in omega 6 fatty acids so it should also be limited.

Other important notes:

Remember that no food program, nor any food combining program, will cure disease. Healing can be effected only by removal of the causes of disease. Incorrect food combinations can be an important cause.

Use seldom if at all— too high in oxalic acid (a calcium antagonist)

Spinach
Swiss chard
Beet tops
Rhubarb

Should not be used— contain concentrated acids & irritants

Bitter cabbage
Endive
Escarole

Contain mustard oil

Irritant foods (unless very young and sweet)— should not be used often or in large quantities

Parsley
Watercress
Chives
Scallions
Onions
Leeks
Radishes
Garlic
Mature mustard greens

In case you have bowel or digestive problems avoid Onions and or Garlic in a raw form. You can use fennel instead. In case you use onion or garlic try the powder form or boil it for one minute before use.

Take It Easy!

Don’t try so hard that you become nervous and anxious. Do the best you can. Avoid the worst combinations (dates or bananas with nuts, potatoes or grains with tomatoes, or grain with nuts) and everything else will gradually fall into place.

Occasional indulgence in incorrect food combinations is no cause for anxiety, even though it is not ideal—a healthy body can cope with occasional exceptions. It is what we do daily, habitually, that will make the difference.

Don’t make food the focal point of your life. Above all, the student should not become overly preoccupied with food. Eat your meal and forget it. Let your friends eat their foods and don’t give them a lecture at the dining table. You may have to parry their questions about your eating habits by explaining that you don’t like to enter into these discussions at mealtime, but will be happy to answer their questions afterwards.

Charts:

Melons

Watermelon
Honeydew melon
Honey balls
Cantaloupe
Muskmelon
Casaba melon
Crenshaw melon
Pie melon
Banana melon
Persian melon
Christmas melon
Nutmeg melon

None of these substances are recommended.

Brown sugar
“Raw” sugar
White sugar
Milk sugar
Maplesyrup
Cane syrup
Corn syrup
Honey

Some high-fat nuts are:

Sweet fruits

Fresh:
Bananas
Persimmons
Thompson grapes (seedless)
Muscat grapes
All sweet grapes
Fresh figs

Dry:
Dates
Figs
Raisins
Prunes
Apricots
Peaches
Apples
Cherries
Bananas
Litchi “nuts”
Carob
All dried fruit

Some unusual or tropical fruits not listed— sweet taste is a good indication of its classification.

Subacid fruits

Sweet apples (Delicious)
Sweet peaches
Sweet nectarines
Pears
Sweet cherries
Papayas
Mangos
Apricots
Fresh Litchi “nuts”
Sweet plums
Blueberries
Raspberries
Blackberries
Mulberries
Huckleberries
Cherimoyas
Some grapes (neither sweet nor sour)

Some unusual or tropical fruits not listed.

Acid fruits

Oranges
Grapefruit
Pineapples
Strawberries
Pomegranates
Lemons
Kiwi fruit
Kumquats
Loquats
Carambolas
Loganberries
Gooseberries
Cranberries (not recommended—they contain benzoic acid)
Limes Sour apples Sour grapes Sour peaches Sour nectarines Sour plums Sour cherries

Tomatoes—acid fruit, without the sugar content of other acid fruits. Used with vegetable salad or any green or nonstarchy vegetables, but not at a starch meal. May be used with nuts or cheese, but not with meat, milk or eggs. Some unusual or tropical fruits are not listed—acid (or sour) taste is a good indication of its classification.

Some high-fat nuts are:

Macadamias 71.6% Fat
Brazils 66.9% Fat
Pecans 71.2% Fat

Some lower-fat nuts and seeds are:

Almonds 54.2% Fat
Pignolias 47.4% Fat
Sunflower seeds 47.3% Fat
Pumpkin seeds 45.8% Fat
Sesame seeds 52.2% Fat

Sources: “http://rawfoodexplained.com”

Even though I have used many information from other websites, I do not personally agree with everything written there. That’s why there are some comments in the “Food Combining” articles which express my opinion according to what I believe is good for MS patients.