Posts tagged Food Intolerance

Popular Big Pharma blood pressure drug linked to gluten sensitivity, Celiac disease

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Article taken from Jonathan Benson: Popular Big Pharma blood pressure drug linked to gluten sensitivity, Celiac disease

(NaturalNews) Is it possible that the massive rise in diagnoses of gluten insensitivity and Celiac disease is in some way linked to the medications people are taking? A new study published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings seems to suggest so, having found that the popular blood pressure drug Benicar (olmesartan) often causes patients to develop symptoms of Celiac disease that later subside when the medication is ceased.

Dr. Joseph A. Murray, M.D., and his colleagues at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., first made the observation after noting that 22 of the patients admitted to the center over a three-year period had symptoms of Celiac disease, but did not test positive for the condition in blood tests. Upon further investigation, the team determined that olmesartan was the likely culprit.

When the patients with Celiac symptoms stopped taking olmesartan, their symptoms largely disappeared, which suggests that the drug and potentially others in its class may be responsible for triggering allergic and gastrointestinal reactions. In fact, a followup investigation revealed that patients who took olmesartan sustained very serious intestinal damage as a result of the drug, and that this damage began to heal when they stopped taking it.

“There is no question that the report from the Mayo Clinic documenting that olmesartan has severe gastrointestinal adverse effects is of concern,” said Dr. Franz Messerli, M.D., director of the hypertension program at St. Luke’s – Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. “Olmesartan sales have exceeded $500 million a year in the U.S. alone and the drug, as with all ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers), stands out because of its paucity of side effects.”

Dr. Murray, author of the study, had actually reported these and other serious side effects associated with ARBs to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) back in 2009. But the agency ignored the evidence and unilaterally decreed that the evidence was not definitive enough to verify a “statistically significant’ association between Celiac disease symptoms and ARBs.

But the evidence speaks for itself, as experts suspect that ARBs inhibit transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), an intestinal cytokine responsible for intestinal equilibrium, also known as homeostasis. By blocking TGF-beta, ARBs prevent the human gut from properly adapting to changing levels and ratios of various bacteria, both good and bad, which upsets digestion and leads to intestinal damage.

“The gut has to learn to tolerate a lot of different bacteria and TGF-beta is an important chemical messenger for that tolerance,” said Dr. Murray to MedPage Today, noting that when patients stopped taking olmesartan, their TGF-beta levels appeared to normalize.

FOOD COMBINING MAY BE THE KEY FOR YOUR DIGESTIVE HEALTH – PART IV (FATS)

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FATS (Avocados, Nuts, other fats):

Use fats sparingly. Even if they are necessary for the human body, the need for fat is small, and the best sources are whole foods like nuts and avocados. Fats delay digestion—may take up to four to six hours. Fats also delay the digestion of other foods and, if used with starch, it will delay the passage of the starch from the stomach into the intestine. Fat not only inhibits the secretion of gastric juice—it also inhibits the physical actions of the stomach. Too much fat taken with a meal results in acid eructations and a burning sensation in the throat.

The use of fat (avocados) with starch is considered acceptable, provided a green salad is included in the meal.

Avocados: Though not a high-protein food, avocados contain more protein than milk. They are high in fat and the small percentage of protein they do contain is of high biological value. Since they are so high in fat that they tend to slow down the digestion of foods normally requiring a shorter digestion time, they are perhaps only a fair combination with subacid* and acid fruit*. They are usually considered a poor combination with sweet fruit, especially dried sweet fruit*.

  • They are best used with a salad meal. When fats (avocados or nuts) are eaten with green vegetables, preferably raw, the inhibiting effect of fats on gastric secretion is counteracted and digestion proceeds quite normally.

  • Don’t combine nuts with starch vegetables, legumes, animal protein or sweet fruits.

  • For optimal digestive efficiency, only one variety of nuts or seeds should be used at a sitting, but, if digestive problems are not a factor, it may be possible to eat two or three varieties together without harm. Some personal experimentation in this area is indicated. Start out with small quantities, one to two ounces, and use only with salads. If you do have problems with nuts, experiment and find those you handle best and use mostly those. You will eventually build, up your nut-digesting ability and be able to use more varieties.
  • Avocados should never be used with nuts, which are also high in fat (see chart)*, nor should they be used with melons (see chart)*.

  • Do not combine cashews with other nuts; the cashew is a part of the cashew apple and is not a true nut. It has a higher carbohydrate content than true nuts, having 29.3% carbohydrate and 17.2% protein. By contrast, for example, the almond has 19.5% carbohydrate and 18.6% protein. They can be eaten with a salad.
  • Peanuts, of course, are not nuts. They are combination starch/protein foods, and are combined as starch.
  • Most people have no problem with sunflower seeds. Those who do can begin by using them slightly sprouted. Just soak overnight, drain and let them progress until just a small sprout is showing.
  • Almonds are valuable nuts, and have a somewhat alkaline reaction, whereas other nuts have the acid reaction commonly found in protein foods. However, they are hard and more difficult to masticate thoroughly. Problems may be avoided by thoroughly masticating and insalivating these nuts.

These fats are not recommended

Butter
Cream

Oils

Use unrefined cold-pressed oils, preferably stable oils like olive and sesame oil, less likely to be rancid. These oils can be moderately cooked.

Olive oil (VERY GOOD CHOICE, DO NOT OVERHEAT, BEST TAKEN RAW)
Sesame oil (LOW CHAIN OIL, GOOD CHOICE FOR COOKING)

Tropical Oils (Coconut oil, Palm Kernel Oil – Very good choices. Can  be kept in room temperatures for months. Very stable when heated)

Flax Seed Oil – Very high in omega 3 content. Keep in the fridge, do not heat. You can use it in small amounts with your salads or salad dressings.

AVOID VEGETABLE OILS – DO NOT HEAT VEGETABLE OILS

Vegetable oils are long chain oils. This means they should not be heated because they become rancid very easily.

Sunflower seed oil
Corn oil
Peanut oil
Cottonseed oil
Safflower oil

Soybean Oil

Should be strictly LIMITED!!! Only Peanut Oil is relatively stable and therefore appropriate for stir-frys on occasion bbut it is very high in omega 6 fatty acids so it should also be limited.

Other important notes:

Remember that no food program, nor any food combining program, will cure disease. Healing can be effected only by removal of the causes of disease. Incorrect food combinations can be an important cause.

Use seldom if at all— too high in oxalic acid (a calcium antagonist)

Spinach
Swiss chard
Beet tops
Rhubarb

Should not be used— contain concentrated acids & irritants

Bitter cabbage
Endive
Escarole

Contain mustard oil

Irritant foods (unless very young and sweet)— should not be used often or in large quantities

Parsley
Watercress
Chives
Scallions
Onions
Leeks
Radishes
Garlic
Mature mustard greens

In case you have bowel or digestive problems avoid Onions and or Garlic in a raw form. You can use fennel instead. In case you use onion or garlic try the powder form or boil it for one minute before use.

Take It Easy!

Don’t try so hard that you become nervous and anxious. Do the best you can. Avoid the worst combinations (dates or bananas with nuts, potatoes or grains with tomatoes, or grain with nuts) and everything else will gradually fall into place.

Occasional indulgence in incorrect food combinations is no cause for anxiety, even though it is not ideal—a healthy body can cope with occasional exceptions. It is what we do daily, habitually, that will make the difference.

Don’t make food the focal point of your life. Above all, the student should not become overly preoccupied with food. Eat your meal and forget it. Let your friends eat their foods and don’t give them a lecture at the dining table. You may have to parry their questions about your eating habits by explaining that you don’t like to enter into these discussions at mealtime, but will be happy to answer their questions afterwards.

Charts:

Melons

Watermelon
Honeydew melon
Honey balls
Cantaloupe
Muskmelon
Casaba melon
Crenshaw melon
Pie melon
Banana melon
Persian melon
Christmas melon
Nutmeg melon

None of these substances are recommended.

Brown sugar
“Raw” sugar
White sugar
Milk sugar
Maplesyrup
Cane syrup
Corn syrup
Honey

Some high-fat nuts are:

Sweet fruits

Fresh:
Bananas
Persimmons
Thompson grapes (seedless)
Muscat grapes
All sweet grapes
Fresh figs

Dry:
Dates
Figs
Raisins
Prunes
Apricots
Peaches
Apples
Cherries
Bananas
Litchi “nuts”
Carob
All dried fruit

Some unusual or tropical fruits not listed— sweet taste is a good indication of its classification.

Subacid fruits

Sweet apples (Delicious)
Sweet peaches
Sweet nectarines
Pears
Sweet cherries
Papayas
Mangos
Apricots
Fresh Litchi “nuts”
Sweet plums
Blueberries
Raspberries
Blackberries
Mulberries
Huckleberries
Cherimoyas
Some grapes (neither sweet nor sour)

Some unusual or tropical fruits not listed.

Acid fruits

Oranges
Grapefruit
Pineapples
Strawberries
Pomegranates
Lemons
Kiwi fruit
Kumquats
Loquats
Carambolas
Loganberries
Gooseberries
Cranberries (not recommended—they contain benzoic acid)
Limes Sour apples Sour grapes Sour peaches Sour nectarines Sour plums Sour cherries

Tomatoes—acid fruit, without the sugar content of other acid fruits. Used with vegetable salad or any green or nonstarchy vegetables, but not at a starch meal. May be used with nuts or cheese, but not with meat, milk or eggs. Some unusual or tropical fruits are not listed—acid (or sour) taste is a good indication of its classification.

Some high-fat nuts are:

Macadamias 71.6% Fat
Brazils 66.9% Fat
Pecans 71.2% Fat

Some lower-fat nuts and seeds are:

Almonds 54.2% Fat
Pignolias 47.4% Fat
Sunflower seeds 47.3% Fat
Pumpkin seeds 45.8% Fat
Sesame seeds 52.2% Fat

Sources: “http://rawfoodexplained.com”

Even though I have used many information from other websites, I do not personally agree with everything written there. That’s why there are some comments in the “Food Combining” articles which express my opinion according to what I believe is good for MS patients.

FOOD COMBINING MAY BE THE KEY FOR YOUR DIGESTIVE HEALTH – PART III (CARBOHYDRATES)

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VEGETABLES: The variety of vegetables is abundant and provides the widest range of suitable food combinations. Fresh salads are optimum nutritionally and combine very well with all grains, or nuts and seeds, or animal proteins or legumes.

  • Ideally, fresh vegetables and cooked vegetables are not the best combinations, especially when including the group of starchy vegetables (see charts).


  • Depending on personal taste, numerous combinations of fresh vegetables can be excellent. The taste and colors of vegetables enhances the appetite of any protein meal and combines very well.

  • Vegetables with dairy foods also combine very well. Remember to avoid diary especially cows products. Goat or sheep products (yogurt, cheese, EXCEPT MILK), if well tolerated could be eaten from time to time. Ideally you can combine any vegetable with any protein food or grain and legume meal.

  • Salads combine very well with proteins or starches. Any nonstarchy vegetables (see charts) may be combined with proteins or starch, except tomatoes, which should especially not be used with starches. The green leafy vegetables combine very well with most other foods. They are excellent food and should be used in the diet.
  • Lettuce and other green and nonstarchy vegetables leave the stomach with little change—they pass through the stomach rapidly unless delayed by oily dressings or foods that require a more thorough gastric digestion.
  • If these vegetables are held up in the stomach with other foods, as when using salad with nuts, there is no fermentation.

STARCHY VEGETABLES.

  • Most starch vegetables need to be cooked for easy digestion. Starch vegetables when cooked are prepaired into less complex starches and when digested they require the action of the enzyme ptyalin,which is produced by the action of chewing and salivary glands.
  • Sliced or grated raw starch vegetables such as carrot,radish,beatroot and pumpkin can be a colourful and nutritious addition to a meal.
  • Ideally,starch vegetables should not be combined with nuts,seeds,grains,legumes and animal proteins.

  • Starch vegetables combine well with one another and they combine fairly well with other cooked vegetables and dairy foods such as cheese or yogurt. If two different starches are eaten together in small quantities, this is thought to not cause problems.
  • Slightly starchy vegetables may be combined with more starchy vegetables (e.g. carrots with potatoes).

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion.

 FRUITS:

  • Do not combine fruit with any vegetables except lettuce and celery.

It is best not to combine fruits with vegetables (especially cooked vegetables), proteins or starches because if such a combination of food is eaten, the digestion of the fruit will be delayed and subject to fermentation. Lettuce and celery, however, may be combined with any fruit except melon, and will cause no problem.

Dr. Vetrano says, “Taking green uncooked vegetables with a fruit meal is perfectly all right. Even though some charts state that subacid and sweet fruits combine fair to poorly with green uncooked vegetables, the feeding practices at the Health School indicate that these are good combinations, indeed, even enhancing digestion of the fruit in some conditions of impaired digestion.”

Acid Fruits, Subacid Fruits, Sweet Fruits (see charts at the end of this article)

  • Acid fruits may be used with subacid fruits.

This is an acceptable combination, though some subacid fruits are rather high in sugar and the acid fruit may delay the sugar’s normally quick exit from the stomach. However, there is no sharp line of division between the acid and subacid fruits. If combining subacid fruit with acid fruit, it is better to use only the less subacid fruit.

The acid fruits are those with the tart flavors, for example, citrus, pineapple, strawberries, and certain varieties of apples and other fruits. Tomatoes are also considered acid fruit (without the sugar content of other acid fruit). Tomatoes should not be combined with subacid fruit, nor any other kinds of fruit.

They are best combined with the salad at a meal at which no starchy foods are served.

Acid fruits are best used alone (a single variety), but if used in combination with other acid fruits, this is considered an acceptable combination.

  • Subacid fruits may be used with sweet fruits.

There is no sharp line of division between subacid fruits and sweet fruits. When using subacid fruits with sweet fruits, it is best to use the sweeter varieties of subacid fruit. The subacid fruits are those that possess a slightly acid flavor (but not tart), such as pears, certain apples, grapes, etc. Grapes, for example, can be acid, subacid or sweet. The sweet fruits are those that are rich in sugar and taste sweet-bananas, persimmons, sweet grapes, and so forth, and all dried fruit.

Some people prefer to eat bananas alone, but most people have no difficulty in combining them with subacid and other sweet fruit at a fruit meal.

Dr. Shelton says, “While I have found that bananas combine fairly well with dates, raisins, grapes and a few other sweet fruits and with green leafy vegetables, such as lettuce and celery, I have noted that they digest best if eaten alone. This calls, to mind the fact that Tilden, also, after much testing of the matter, reached the conclusion that bananas are best eaten alone.”

Dried sweet fruits should be used sparingly. Use but one kind at a meal, in small amounts, combined only with subacid fruit and/or fresh sweet fruit and/or with lettuce and/or celery. Overeating of dried fruits will often bring on symptoms similar to a “cold”. The sugar concentration is naturally greater in fruits which have been dried. Some dried fruits, esp. dried apricots, should be soaked overnight to replenish the missing water. Dates are usually used without soaking, figs or raisins can be used either way. If they are rather hard, soaking will soften and improve them.

Sweet fruits combine fairly well with subacid fruits, provided the subacid fruits are on the “sweet side,” for example, use Delicious apples, not Macintosh or Jonathans, with sweet fruit.

It is best to have these fruits at a fruit meal combining only with lettuce and/or celery. Since fruits are usually high in acids or sugars, they do not combine well with other foods.

  • Do not combine sweet fruits with foods that require a long digestive time-foods such as proteins, starches and acid fruits.

The sugars in sweet fruit should be tree to leave the stomach quickly, in perhaps fifteen or twenty minutes, and are apt to ferment if digestion is delayed by mixture with other foods.

Sugar-starch combinations cause additional problems.

When sugar is taken, the mouth quickly fills with saliva, but no ptyalin is present. Ptyalin is essential for starch digestion. If starch is disguised by sugar, honey, molasses, syrup or sweet fruit, the signals are scrambled and digestion is impaired.

Fermentation is inevitable if sugars of any kind are delayed in the stomach awaiting the digestion of starch, protein or acid fruit.

Sugar also has a marked inhibiting effect on the flow of gastric juice and on gastric motility. No other food depresses the action of the stomach and the desire for food as does sugar.

Take Melons Alone

  • Do not consume melons with any other foods.

This rule has been somewhat under question in recent years. Many people who have complained that melons did not agree with them have no trouble handling them when eating only melon at a meal. If you have a history of digestive problems, don’t do it at all.

Melons are more than 90 percent liquid and leave the stomach quickly if not delayed and fermented by combining with other foods.

Generally, all fruits require fairly simple digestion when compaired to starches,proteins and fats,but melons require no digestion in the stomach and are basically the simplest food to assimulate, due to their very high water content and very simple structure;they contain no protein,no fats and a minute carbohydrate content. Melons are best thought of as a drink and should not be eaten after a large meal.They are an ideal breakfast food,make a melon fruit salad with no other food and that will provide maximum benefits and taste sensation. A small quantity of melon with a fruit salad is alright occasionally. Avoid eating melons though with or after a large complex meal because fermentation can occur and lead to gass and possibly stomach and intestinal pains. Let the melon give you the simplest meal alone.

Dr. Vetrano says, “Melons are best taken alone because the sugar and other nutriments are in a less stable form than the nutrients of other fruits. Orange juice may be kept in the refrigerator for an hour with little change in flavor, but if you refrigerate watermelon juice for only ten minutes, its flavor, color and composition markedly change. It decomposes much more quickly than other fruits. Consequently, if it is held in the stomach awaiting the digestion of other foods, it will decompose (ferment) and cause a great deal of gastric distress. Eating watermelon with nuts can really be troublesome.”

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion.

CHARTS

Full list of starchy vegetables

All kinds of potatoes are in this classification. Also included are yams, winter squashes (such as buttercup, hubbard and banana squashes), pumpkin, caladium root, taro root, cassava root and Jerusalem artichokes. (Note: Technically, squashes and pumpkins are fruits.)

Vegetable

% of Carbohydrates

% of Fats

% of Proteins

Glycemic Index

Quantity

Beet canned

90

3

7

64

1 cup (246 g)

Black Beans boiled

74

3

23

64

1 cup (172 g)

Beet cooked

71

6

23

30

1 cup (144 g)

Beet greens

71

6

23

64

1 cup (144 g)

White Sweet Corn, raw

80

11

9

56

1 cup (254 g)

Parsnips

91

4

5

97

Half cup (178 g)

Potato New, boiled

93

1

6

59

Half cup (78 g)

Potato Red, baked

88

2

10

93

(299 g)

Potato Sweet

93

1

6

52

1 cup (200 g)

Potato White, mashed

90

1

9

70

299 g

Tomato orange

72

10

18

50

1 cup (158 g)

Tomato soup

84

8

8

38

Half cup (121 g)

Yam

95

1

4

54

1 cup (136 g)

Green Peas, soup

65

15

20

66

Half cup (128 g)

Green Peas, frozen

72

4

24

47

1 cup (134 g)

Peas, boiled

68

5

27

48

1 cup (160 g)

Lima Beans, frozen

76

2

22

32

311 g

Baked Beans canned

79

3

18

48

1 cup (253 g)

Kidney Beans boiled

73

3

24

29

1 cup

Garbanzo Beans Chickpeas)

78

8

14

33

1 cup (240 g)

Lima Beans

77

3

20

32

124 g

Navy Beans

74

3

23

38

262 g

Pinto Beans canned

72

8

20

39

240 g

Lentils boiled

70

3

27

30

200 g

Plantains cooked

97

1

2

70

200 g

Winter Acorn baked

93

2

5

205 g

Winter Butternut boiled

93

2

5

51

205

Mildly starchy vegetables:

This classification includes carrots, cauliflower, beets, rutabaga and salsify.

Carrots
Globe artichokes
Beets
Rutabaga
Edible pod peas
Winter squash (acorn, butternut, hubbard, banana, etc.)*
Pumpkin*
Water chestnuts
Sprouted grains

Low starchy Vegetables

Vegetable

Form

Carb Count

Sprouts (Beans, Alfafa)

Raw

0.4

Greens (Lettuce, Spinach, Chard) (Half cup)

Raw

1.6

Aparagus

Boiled

0.7

Bamboo Shoots

Canned

0.7

Spring Cabbage

Boiled

0.6

Celery

Raw

0.9

Watercress

Raw

0.4

Common Mushrooms

Raw

0.4

Chicory

Raw

1

Curly Kale

Raw

1.4

Green and Purple Broccolli

Boiled

1.3

Chinese Cabbage

Raw

1.4

Courgette (Zucchini)

Raw

1.8

Unpeeled Cucumber

Raw

1.5

Fennel

Raw

1.8

Lettuce

Raw

1.2

Marrow

Boiled

1.8

Asparagus

Raw

2

Aubergine (Eggplant)

Raw

2.2

Cauliflower

Boiled

2.3

Pumpkin

Raw

2.2

Red Radish

Raw

2

Capsicum (Green Pepper)

Raw

2.6

Basic Acid Fruits:

Blackberry, Orange, Passion Fruit, Strawberry, Tangerine, Tomato (technically a fruit), Ugly Fruit, Grapefruit, Acerola Cherry, Grapefruit, Pineapple.

Basic Subacid Fruits:

Apple, Papaya, Peach, Pear, Raspberry, Ugly Fruit, Apricot, Blackberry, Blueberry, Grape, Cherry, Mango, Mulberry, Nectarine, Tamarillo, Guava.

Basic Sweet Fruits:

Banana, Date, Fig, Sapote, Persimmon, Cherimoya, Carob, Mammea, Plantain, Sapodilla, Sugar Apple.

Melons:

Watermelon, Honeydew, Casaba, Cantaloupe, Ambrosia, Banana Melon, Canary, Gaia, Muskmelon, Rock Melon, Winter Melon.

Cereal grains:

This includes all cereals, whether they’re whole or refined, raw or cooked. Examples are wheat, rye, barley, rice, millet, buckwheat and oats.

Legumes:

This includes peanuts, lentils, peas and beans.

Raw foods improve the total inner environment. Sluggish bowels begin to move, eventually cleaning out waste that may have been lodged in the folds of the intestine for months. The layer of mucus that forms in the intestines when cooked food predominates is removed, greatly increasing efficiency in the absorption of nutrients. Food wastes don’t stay in the bowel long enough to putrefy. The transit time of raw food in a healthy body is 20 to 24 hours, while cooked food may take three days or longer.

Don’t forget to print the chart which follows in order to remember and try the food combinations! Click here in case  you have problems with enlarging the image.

Sources: http://www.rawfoodexplained.com

FOOD COMBINING MAY BE THE KEY FOR YOUR DIGESTIVE HEALTH – PART II (PROTEIN)

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Protein, Carbohydates, Fat and their deeper classifications

Most foods can be readily classified according to the organic compounds (proteins, carbohydrates, fats, etc.) they contain in greatest abundance.

Proteins, along with carbohydrates and fats, form the major components of living matter. They maintain the functional activity of the cells and serve as structural and reserve materials.

This is a general classification of foods. EVERY food contains more or less an amount of protein, carbohydrates and/or fats at the same time, of course, each in different proportions. Meats for example are basically high in protein and that’s why they are characterized as proteins even if they also contain carbs and fats, vegetables or legumes contain basically carbohydrates and thus characterized as carbs etc. Same goes for nuts, fruits etc. Going deeper to these analogies will help us find out the right combinations so that we have the best digestion and less delay of foods in our stomach or the gut, which can cause fermentation and several bad bacteria to grow.

Let’s examine some basic rules of food combining concerning protein:

ANIMAL PROTEINS::Compared to all other food groups,the animal protein foods require the most complex digestion, especially within the stomach. They all require high concen-trations of the enzyme pepsinogen,which is made up from hydrochloric acid and the enzyme pepsin.

  • The best combination for animal protein foods is with salads or cooked vegetables, ΝΟ starchy vegetables (see below). Therefore, do not combine nuts with cheese, nor any of the following concentrated protein foods with each other: nuts, avocado, soy beans, cheese, eggs, flesh foods.
  • Alfalfa sprouts, which are considered a green vegetable, may be used with a concentrated protein.
  • A seafood combination is alright if no other food groups are eaten at the same time, apart from salads.
  • A mixed grill is a very complicated meal to digest, especially when potatoes and other starches are combined. DO NOT combine animal protein with starches. Your body requires an acid base to digest proteins and an alkaline base to digest starches.

  • Any fish meal is ideal with salads or cooked vegetables. Fish and chips are a fair combination,but not as a regular meal.
  • Eggs should not be combined with other animal proteins. Eggs in vegetable omelets is alright.
  • It is not recommended to combine any animal protein food with another or with cheese.

  • Do not eat acid fruits (see chart) with proteins. Citrus, tomatoes, pineapple, strawberries and other acid fruits should not be eaten with nuts, cheese, eggs or meat. Acid fruits inhibit the flow of gastric juice. The digestion of protein requires an unhampered flow. This is one rule that has given rise to some disagreement and controversy.
  • Do not consume proteins with fats (see chart).

Fat has an inhibiting influence on digestive secretion and lessen the amount and activity of pepsin and hydrochloric acid, necessary for the digestion of protein. The fat may lower the entire digestive tone more than 50 percent. Since most proteins already contain a good deal of fat, it would certainly be contraindicated to add more to the meal.

Keep the meals simple and you will be assured of better digestion. If you find any of these rules bad for your stomach simply do not apply it. Above the theories, reality is the best guide for you!

Starchy or high Carbohydrate Vegetables

All kinds of potatoes are in this classification. Also included are yams, winter squashes (such as buttercup, hubbard and banana squashes), pumpkin, caladium root, taro root, cassava root and Jerusalem artichokes. (Note: Technically, squashes and pumpkins are fruits.).

Full list of starchy vegetables

Vegetable

% of Carbohydrates

% of Fats

% of Proteins

Glycemic Index

Quantity

Beet canned

90

3

7

64

1 cup (246 g)

Black Beans boiled

74

3

23

64

1 cup (172 g)

Beet cooked

71

6

23

30

1 cup (144 g)

Beet greens

71

6

23

64

1 cup (144 g)

White Sweet Corn, raw

80

11

9

56

1 cup (254 g)

Parsnips

91

4

5

97

Half cup (178 g)

Potato New, boiled

93

1

6

59

Half cup (78 g)

Potato Red, baked

88

2

10

93

(299 g)

Potato Sweet

93

1

6

52

1 cup (200 g)

Potato White, mashed

90

1

9

70

299 g

Tomato orange

72

10

18

50

1 cup (158 g)

Tomato soup

84

8

8

38

Half cup (121 g)

Yam

95

1

4

54

1 cup (136 g)

Green Peas, soup

65

15

20

66

Half cup (128 g)

Green Peas, frozen

72

4

24

47

1 cup (134 g)

Peas, boiled

68

5

27

48

1 cup (160 g)

Lima Beans, frozen

76

2

22

32

311 g

Baked Beans canned

79

3

18

48

1 cup (253 g)

Kidney Beans boiled

73

3

24

29

1 cup

Garbanzo Beans Chickpeas)

78

8

14

33

1 cup (240 g)

Lima Beans

77

3

20

32

124 g

Navy Beans

74

3

23

38

262 g

Pinto Beans canned

72

8

20

39

240 g

Lentils boiled

70

3

27

30

200 g

Plantains cooked

97

1

2

70

200 g

Winter Acorn baked

93

2

5

205 g

Winter Butternut boiled

93

2

5

51

205 g

Mildly starchy vegetables

This classification includes carrots, cauliflower, beets, rutabaga and salsify.

Carrots
Globe artichokes
Beets
Rutabaga
Edible pod peas
Winter squash (acorn, butternut, hubbard, banana, etc.)*
Pumpkin*
Water chestnuts
Sprouted grains

Low starchy Vegetables

Vegetable

Form

Carb Count

Sprouts (Beans, Alfafa)

Raw

0.4

Greens (Lettuce, Spinach, Chard) (Half cup)

Raw

1.6

Aparagus

Boiled

0.7

Bamboo Shoots

Canned

0.7

Spring Cabbage

Boiled

0.6

Celery

Raw

0.9

Watercress

Raw

0.4

Common Mushrooms

Raw

0.4

Chicory

Raw

1

Curly Kale

Raw

1.4

Green and Purple Broccolli

Boiled

1.3

Chinese Cabbage

Raw

1.4

Courgette (Zucchini)

Raw

1.8

Unpeeled Cucumber

Raw

1.5

Fennel

Raw

1.8

Lettuce

Raw

1.2

Marrow

Boiled

1.8

Asparagus

Raw

2

Aubergine (Eggplant)

Raw

2.2

Cauliflower

Boiled

2.3

Pumpkin

Raw

2.2

Red Radish

Raw

2

Capsicum (Green Pepper)

Raw

2.6

BASIC CHART (CLICK TO ENLARGE):

Sources: http://www.rawfoodexplained.com

Wrong Nutrition

0

Many people suffer from Food Intolerance. This means their organism cannot “identify” one or more foods. I would characterise Food Allergy as a subclass of Food Intolerance. The question is: are we aware of this indisputable fact? In some cases these problems cause symptoms which are visible but in many other cases we are not able to notice. For example I’m sure you’ve heard that eggs, milk, mushrooms or other foods may cause almost instant skin allergies (inflammations etc) and it’s true. Other symptoms maybe pains (eg headaches), diarrhoeas, vomiting, often dizziness etc.

But, what happens if you are affected inside your body from certain foods without being able to notice? Or what if you suffer from a disease (such as MS) which one of its basic causes is food intolerance? This is totally different because you are not in the position to notice directly or imagine that your problem is connected to food allergy.
The best thing to do is consult a dietitian or a nutritionist to give you a food allergy test.

WHAT REAHomer's RecipiesLLY HAPPENS WHEN FOOD INTOLERANCE – ALLERGIES OCCUR?

Human body in such situations performs several abnormal reactions eg not digesting one or more foods, constipation problems, celiac disfunctions etc. Chronic experience of these problems can leads mathematically to serious illnesses such MS or numerous other health problems. Substances coming from wrong nutrtion keeps accumulate into our body and here is where real dangers begin. Our immune system cannot in a way identify these substances and it’s being challenged. The “enemies” (antigens) must be destroyed so the im

mune system produces antibodies in order to attack them. The results sooner or later become noticable. Our immune system attacks to healthy tissues and several autoimmune diseases are born. We are attacked by our own defense!

Of course it is not necessary that wrong nutrition will for sure lead someone to MS but it is a very important factor which if we do not take into serious consideration we will never make a significant progress to what we call MS confrontation.

 

THE SOLUTION

First of all try to think if any obvious symptoms of the above or others happens to you often. Secondly visit a doctor to give you a food allergy test. The soonest you are aware of the foods that you are intolerant to the better. Then simply remove them from your diet for as long as your dietist advises you. In most cases this incudes the use of food supplements or/and other substances such as vitamins.

For more about my diet visit Here…

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